We Partner 4 Research | Clinical Trials In Washington DC, VA, MD

Suffering from Insomnia?

Unable to fall asleep?

Unable to stay asleep?

You may be eligible to participate in a drug-free clinical trial researching a new treatment modality for treating insomnia. This study involves brain stimulation using a mild battery-driven stimulator.

 

To qualify for this drug-free clinical trial at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital you should be older than 18 years and have any of the following problems (at least 3 nights a week, for at least 3 months):

  1. Difficulty falling asleep (it takes you longer than 20 minutes to fall asleep)

  2. Difficulty staying sleep (you wake up after falling sleep and can’t go back to sleep)

  3.  Waking up too early (and not being able to go back to sleep)

 

You may not eligible to participate in this study if any of the following applies to you:

  • Sleep apnea

  • Pregnancy

  • Addiction (alcohol, drugs)

  • Psychosis

  • Severe mood disorder

  • Addiction (alcohol, drugs)

  • Severe medical conditions which may require special care at night such as severe heart/lung diseases

  • Mental retardation

  • Mere circadian disorder (delayed or advanced phase shift)

  • Sleep misperception insomnia (a genuine perception of insomnia on the side of the individual while he/she actually sleeps will)

 

Participating in this study is voluntary and the study will be free of charge.

If you meet the above criteria and you are willing to participate, email us at contact@wepartner4research.org to arrange an office visit during which we will further discuss the study and your condition to make sure you meet all the criteria.

What the study will require from you:

1. You will have two overnight sleep studies on two separate nights (2 weeks apart) at the hospital.

2. You will fill out some forms at the star and at the end of the study (a total of 6 weeks).

3. If you are taking sleep medication, your sleep medications will be gradually cut down and you will remain off of such medication for the duration of the study (6 weeks).

"" This project was funded in whole or in part with federal funding (UL1TR00010101 previously UL1RR031975) from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institutes of Health, through the Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program (CTSA). , a trademark of DHHS, as part of the "Re-Engineering the Clinical Research Enterprise" project.